Tesla Charging Time: Everything You Need To Know

Tesla has been the hot news of the time since they introduced electric cars. They run by electricity instead of gasoline. The speed and power of these cars are on par with the cars run by engines. The most concern that is seen about these cars is the charging system. Like, have you ever thought how long does it take to charge a Tesla?

Well, it can take from an hour to days to charge your Tesla. The charging time depends on the charging station type you are using and the capacity of the battery. If you use Tesla superchargers, it may take about an hour to charge while using a normal home outlet may take days to fully charge your Tesla.

There are a number of ways to answer this question. I am going to describe the topic in every possible way. First of all, we need to know the types of charging systems and the battery capacities of Tesla cars.

How Long Does It Take To Charge A Tesla

What are the battery capacities of Tesla?

Tesla has 4 models of cars. Each of them has their own unique batteries. Model S and Model X have a battery capacity of 100 KWH. Model 3 Standard version has a 50 KWH battery and Long range version has an 82 KWH battery. Model Y has a battery capacity of 75 KWH.

The amount of charging period is directly proportional to these values of battery capacity. With the same charger, if you need 5 hours to charge a 50 KWH battery, then you will need about 10 hours to charge a 100 KWH battery.

Now let’s see the types of chargers available in the market to charge a Tesla.

How Long Does It Take To Charge A Tesla?

Like I said earlier, it takes from 1 hour to days to charge a Tesla. The charging period varies depending on the type of charger and your battery capacity. I am going to show you how long it may take to charge each model of Tesla using each of the adapters.

Using Level 1 Charging:

Using a NEMA 5-15 adapter you can plug you Tesla in a 120 V ac outlet in your house. It has a very low range of charging speed covering only 2-3 miles per hour. It draws a power of about 1.4 KWH.

To charge a Tesla model S and X with a Nema 5-15 will take around 72 hours. Model 3 standard version will take around 35 hours and long range will take 58 hours to charge completely. Model Y will take around 54 hours to charge.

Using Level 2 Charging:

Using a NEMA 14-50 or a wall connector serves a much fast charging. It covers a range of around 30 miles per hour of charging. It draws a power of about 17 KWH.

The wall connector gives a better charging rate than the NEMA 14-50 adapters. To know about wall connector installation, you may checkout this Tesla Wall connector installation guide.

To charge a Model S and X it takes about 6-7 hours to fully charge the battery.  And even less for the other models. Model 3 standard version will take only 3-4 hours and long range version will take 5 hours to charge. Model Y will take 4.5 hours.

Using Level 3 Charging:

Level 3 charging includes DCFC or DC fast charging at 480 V. It is found in the Tesla supercharging stations. It takes 30 minutes to 1.5 hours to charge any Tesla cars available at this point. That is, up to 170 miles of range in only 30 minutes of charging. It draws out about 140 KW of power. You can find the cost of charging stations in this article (Are Tesla charging stations free?)

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs):

I always receive a lot of questions regarding these topics. So I am going to pick all the questions related to charging period of Tesla and answer them for you.

1. How Long Does It Take To Charge A Tesla Model S?

There are several ways to charge your Tesla model S. If you are using a NEMA 5-15 adapter it will take 3 days to charge your car. For a faster charging you can use level two chargers. A NEMA 14-50 adapter or a wall connector will take around 7-18 hours depending on the current output of the charger.

Charging stations are the fastest way to charge your car. It will take only about an hour to fully charge the battery.

1. How Long Does It Take To Charge A Tesla Model S

2. How Long Does It Take To Charge A Tesla Model 3?

It will take 35 to 58 hours depending on the versions of Model 3 to charge using a NEMA 5-15 adapter. If you use a NEMA 15-50 adapter or a wall connector, it will only take 3-5 hours to charge your car. Using a supercharger, it will take only about 30-45 minutes to charge your Tesla Model 3.

3. How Long Does It Take To Charge A Tesla With A Super Charger?

It takes only about 30 minutes to 1.5 hours to charge any model of Tesla at the charging stations using a super charger. If you are using a Tesla Model S or X, it will take close to 1 hour. While a Tesla Model 3 or Y will take 30 to 45 minutes to fully charge the battery.

4. Which Charging Method Is Healthy For Tesla Battery?

Level 2 charging is the best way to charge your battery in terms of both efficiency and battery health. In this case a wall connector or a NEMA 14-50 gives you the second level charging.

On the other hand level one charging is way too slow. And continuous use of superchargers takes a lot of money and not the best for your battery. These are home charging methods mainly. To know what you need to charge your Tesla at home visit the article (What is needed to charge a Tesla at home?)

Conclusion

Well, there are a bunch of Tesla models out there. And the batteries have various capacities. Then again there are the different charging adapters. So, the time to charge a Tesla always varies depending on these factors.

To clear all the confusions I have articulated all the details about the charging techniques and the time they take to charge the battery of a Tesla. I am sure you will find everything you need to know here. Look in to our other articles on Tesla to find our more.

About Jeremy

Hello! My name is Jeremy Bloomberg. I have been passionate about carpentry and DIY. Over the years, my passion slowly turned into expertise and wider knowledge about electronics. I’ve been involved in numerous projects, both professional and personal. I want to share all I have learned with you. Welcome!

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